Tag Archives: KM Elkes

Flash Fiction ‘Noir’
Evening of Readings

Sat. 25th November 
7.30 pm – 9.30 pm
late bar, free snacks
St James' Wine Vaults
www.stjameswinevaults.co.uk
10 St James St
Bath
BA1 2TW
 

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A special November event in honour of NaMicroWrimo – National Micro Writing Month – where you’re challenged to write a flash each day for the month of November.

Now the nights are drawing in, come and listen to some darker-themed flash fictions. A variety of styles of short short fiction from two of our regulars Meg Pokrass and KM Elkes and four other guest readers – Damhnait Monaghan, Christopher Stanley, Jason Jackson and John Wheway. All writers will be reading for ten minutes each. There’s a break in the middle to buy drinks at the bar.

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May Flash Fiction Evening

Friday 26th May 
7.30 pm – 9.30 pm
late bar, free nibbles
St James' Wine Vaults
www.stjameswinevaults.co.uk
10 St James Street
Bath
BA1 2TW

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We've another great line-up of six flash fiction writers who will each read a selection of short fictions for ten minutes each. There's a break after the first three readers for drinks, nibbles and chats.

Reading this time, two of our regulars, Meg Pokrass and KM Elkes plus new to the reading series Joanna Campbell, John Holland and Tracy Fells. Jude Higgins organiser of the Bath Flash Fiction contests and of these events will also be reading.

Come to hear a huge variety of flash fiction. It's always a lot of fun. We'd love to see you there.

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Fissures
by Grant Faulkner
Reviewed by KM Elkes

In his introduction to Fissures, A Collection of a Hundred 100-word Stories, the author Grant Faulkner explains that the book is a “bag full of shards”, each one capturing the small, telling moments of existence: “I’ve always thought life is more about what is unsaid than what is said. We live in odd gaps of silence, irremediable interstices that sometimes last forever.”

Fissures is certainly an apt title – many of the stories revolve around moments of separation and disconnection; the heartache of missed chances, sexual loneliness and the deep cracks that open between lovers, travellers or families.

It’s not an easy task to achieve this level of resonance and depth when much of the armoury deployed in narrative fiction – plot, characterisation, pacing, extended imagery, description etc. – is limited by the drabble form. But this brings another kind of freedom – to create stories, sometimes tilted towards the fantastical, that contain just enough narrative thrust to create movement and change.
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Jude, Ken, Meg, Tino, Diane, Carrie

Our First Evening of Flash
An account and the start of something new

When we learned that Meg Pokrass, our novella-in-flash judge, was in the UK this summer, prior to moving here permanently, we grasped the opportunity to invite her to read and meet some other flash fiction writers in the South West. The evening was a resounding success. The lovely upstairs room in St James' Wine Vaults in Bath was packed and the audience enjoyed a true feast of flash-fictions – a great mixture of styles, tastes and cultural differences.
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